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. california -- he is going to win. it will put barack obama over. he is going to pick up a couple of those other states as well. new york has already gotten in new jersey and i want to stress here that they are not officially written off yet. those are the states that barack obama almost by definition wins. therein lies the argument for mitt romney to counter that with an unnecessary win in florida and he has to pick up virginia. you know, you lose ohio and with the rest of the states that are not called for. you have to win them all. therein lies the difficult math. not impossible, but difficult. the republicans are not closing the deal on the senate. we are going to peter barnes. we could be looking at a mirror image of what we have seen already. the repeat image of the last four years. democratic president, democratic senate red republican house. if anyone expect them all to play together, may i introduce my 10-year-old boy and 9-year-old boy. i will leave it at that. you see us, at the start of the day. on the company phone list that's a few names longer. you see us bank on busier high
@journal.org. talk a little bit about proposition 8 in california. as the impact what could happen this time around? guest: let me go back and say, marriage equality is no longer a partisan issue. if you look at socio-economic trends across this country, americans from all walks of life, all parts of this country, all sorts of americans, republicans, democrats, catholics, episcopalians, they all support marriage equality in majority's right now. that is probably one of the largest of allusions of has taken place since 2006 and 2008. you are right. perhaps the most high-profile marriage equality battle took place in 2008 in california around prop 8. unfortunately, we lost by just a few percentage points. as a result of that, prop. 8, a group called the american foundation for equal rights decided to launch a constitutional challenge for that vote. and it stands for is right now before the supreme court and on november 20, they will decide whether or not to take up that case. host: a paul talking about support for gay marriage. referenced that 50% of those who were polled, say it should be on the bal
a record turn out in california. the secretary of state says many precincts reporting a high volume of voters. 18 million people registered to vote for the election. that is a state record. half of those plan to vote by mail.uu=÷ >> really interesting to see such a large turn out in polling places because i'm also suspecting that we're going to have largest vote by mail turn out in the history of the state. >> that is a big achievement considering only 31% of the eligible voters took part in the june primary. many voters dropped off ballot was out leaving their cars. san jose's most watched race is measure did. california schools banking on prop 30, governor jerry brown proposed that plan, today voted for it. people in oakland greeted him in the oakland hills, proposition 30 raises money for public schools and community colleges and temporarily add a quarter cent tax to state sales tax and raise taxes for californians earning more than $250,000 a year. opponents say it's too expensive. here is a look at propositions. prop 32 preventing unions from deducting money from paychecks to
in santa barbara, california. caller: hello. good morning. i guess my comment is, and kind of glad that the spectacle of elections are over. and maybe we can start to focus on some of the serious issues that still remain. i notice you just made a comment that reid had put out an olive branch to john boehner and mitch mcconnell. i am hoping that at some point in the future that may be c-span can run some segments on the article 5 convention. i really think that we needed to a convention of state delegates to deliberate over certain issues that none of the candidates talked about. i am very concerned about proprietary source codes and electronic voting machines. i am concerned about voter fraud, i am concerned about corporate control of what makes it out of a committee to the floor for a vote and what does not. my comment is, am glad the elections are over. i hope it can start to address some serious issues. host: that is john in santa barbara. usa today lead editorial -- voters can obama a subdued second term mandate. barack obama is election in 2008 made history purity become the f
. and even campaigning for incoming members who were in cakewalks in north carolina and cowart -- california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail.possibly in he to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be run around a corner -- right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still count
california are preparing for their first major wet storm of the season. a super soaker expected to stick around right through the weekend. free sandbags were given away ahead of the drenching rain that could trigger flooding as well as mud slides. the storm is also stirring up 70-mile-an-hour winds and up to 2 feet of wet snow in the mountains. >>> in pennsylvania a snowstorm that made a mess of the morning commute triggered crash after crash in the central and eastern part of the state. semitrucks jackknifed in the poconos, and cars ran off the road. some drivers were stuck in traffic for hours. several children suffered minor injuries actually when their school bus overturned in the middle of all that slippery mess. >>> and with that, here's a look at your wednesday weather, hopefully a bit calmer for most folks. drying out on the east coast today. sunny skies all the way done to florida. cooler along the gulf coast. milder than normal in the rockies. and that pacific storm also will bring rain to seattle and portland as well as heavy snow to the cascade. >> 40s in the pacific northwes
, illinois, california, and new york, the democrats are going to pick up 104 electoral college there and they did nothing there except go there for fund-raisers. that just shows you how sure we have of these states that are so blue and so red. but it's those nine states that we're talking about. that's what it's going to come down to, those nine battleground states and they are all-- with the possible exception of ohio-- all within the margin of error right now. >> pelley: norah, what do you see going into election tonight? >> one of the things i think is interesting is how much of the country has voted today before election day, the so-called early vote. it's been growing over the years. today we've seen more than 30 million people have turned out at the polls. interestingly enough, scott, the battleground state where this early vote has turned out. look at this. colorado, 77% has already voted. nevada. 72%. north carolina, 63% has already voted. in florida 53%. iowa 44%. and ohio 31%. john dickerson and i were talking about this earlier today. we could have most of the result
, ticket sales spiked 500% because of an influx of players from california and arizona, states that don't sell powerball tickets. anybody come over from san diego? >> yes, they came from san diego, l.a. >> reporter: optimistic americans with a dollar and a dream went on a powerball binge. >> i'm the winner. >> reporter: at one point, 130,000 tickets were being sold every minute. >> everybody thinks they're the lucky ones. >> reporter: the jackpot rolled over 16 times without a winner. that's why it got so huge. amazingly, this is not the biggest u.s. lottery prize ever. in march of this year, three tickets shared a megamillions jackpot of $656 million. last night, nearly 9 million ticketholders won smaller consolation prizes. if you matched 5 out of 6 winning numbers, you'll take home prizes totalling more than $130 million. and for the rest of us, there's jimmy kimmel's advice. >> the lottery is an opportunity for your dream to come true, especially if your dream is to lose a dollar. >> reporter: lottery officials are saying that when the numbers drawn are low number, in this case, all
mocked her for her war record, joe walsh. california relaxed its three strikes you're out law and rejected a law to cripple the power of unions. criminal legalization of marijuana was approved in washington and montana. sherrod brown and jon tester both won, held on to their seats. democrats won a senate seat in north dakota, of all places, a seat that nobody thought they could win. all of these states that had this hugely aggressive total republican takeover from the 2010 elections, ohio and wisconsin, and michigan, and pennsylvania and virginia and florida, all of those states that went so red in state government in these past couple of years and that then had these big fights inside their states over how republicans were governing there, in ohio, wisconsin, michigan, pennsylvania, virginia, and we will see about florida, last night not only did republicans lose the presidential election in every single one of those states, republicans lost the senate race in every single one of those states too. sherrod brown, tammy baldwin, debbie stabenow, bob casey, tim kaine, bill nelso
to california. her family would like to go back. she might still around again because -- she raised $215 million. she is the house's biggest fund- raiser. >> we will end up with a more polarized congress. steny hoyer is more moderate. he is an institutional -- has been around for decades and represents a lot of the new democrats. the big question will be, will party, a caucus dominated by liberals and i would say democrats are much more liberal than your average democrat around the country. will they tolerate steny hoyer who they do not see as one of their own? they see him as a compromiser. >> the white house has been ignoring -- democrats have been an afterthought. if they had a leader, there would have more muscle. >> one thing that i find interesting to watch is when you can step back and look at the bigger picture, you have a house that is not budging and testing republican. which means that how frustrated that american people are about the non action, about the tea party. this means that i think barack obama should be on the losing end of this campaign because the american people want a ch
it to their advantage in states like illinois. california is a whole different story where you have an independent commission drawing the lines there. it really will dramatically shape control of congress. >> i was simply going to make the point about illinois. the viewers don't think it's only the republicans who are redrawing districts. democrats did the exact same thing in illinois, and we'll see what the results are. sometimes they draw districts expecting a certain outcome and the voters surprise them. >> brown: while we're talking about the how, because earlier we talked about the senate in a kind of bigger picture. stu, remind us about the house situation. >> all 435 seats are up in the house but not all 435 are competitive. only about 70 or so are really worth watching for the chance of one party to steal a seat from the other party. the democrats need 25 seats in order toigate majority and presumably reinstall california, nancy pelosi as speaker be as she once was. that seems unlikely. the democrats have said we have enough seats in play, and when we get out west, california, washington,
their own supermajorities in both chambers in california and illinois. in the state of carolina, in the state of north carolina they gained a republican supermajority in the house and senate. in georgia, they appear in georgia, they appear one independent away from having one in the senate. with might winning 24 states on wednesday, no one expected the president's coattails to turn blue. republican gains in the deep, red south is kind of like running up the score. down the ballot has less to do with coattails than with parkas than with hoods. against the bitter cold that defines february and march. outside the virginia state capitol in richmond. voters are looking for leadership at all levels of governance and they vote in changes. they are not stupid. elections have consequences and they go both ways. if you think running a restaurant is hard try running four. fortunately we've got ink. it gives us 5x the rewards on our internet, phone charges and cable, plus at office supply stores. rewards we put right back into our business. this is the only thing we've eve
, there are two in arizona that have yet to be called, 3 in california, 1 in north carolina, and one in florida. these have not been called because ballots are still being counted. mostly overseas and military balance, some early voting, especially in arizona. that is what is still being counted. host: are any of these expected to go to a recount? is it just provisional ballots and absentee ballots? guest: i think a couple will go to recounts. the closest, i believe, is in california in the seventh district. i think that will definitely be going to a recount. also in north carolina, the margin is 400 votes in a race with mike macentire. another is inlflorid awhere allen west is behind by 2400 votes. i think c-span viewers are familiar with him and knows he is not somebody that gives up easily. host: what would be the biggest upset from your perspective from the stresses that have not been called? guest: i think the biggest upset would be the race in arizona's second district which is where ron barber is the incumbent. host: that is the aide to former congressman gabby gifford. guest: this was h
the campaign. >> remember when carl drove they did a bunch of california events at the end of their race when george w. bush was running just to get inside the opponent's head. don't overestimate the maturity of what's going on. >> woodruff: i'm told they have senate races that we are prepared to call. i'm just looking at what time it is. it's 22 minutes after 9:00 on the east coast. we are able to project for the pennsylvania senate that bob casey is returning for a second term. >> ifill: he beat tom smith who was a very well known tea-part candidate. he put a lot of money in. >> $20 million of his own money. the democratic incumbent wins in michigan. >> woodruff: i remember the day when there weren't that many women. we've just announced three in a row. here in texas someone who will replace a woman in the senate. he is ted cruz. he has been very closely affiliated with the tea party. this is a win for the republicans in the state of texas and a very important win. >> ifill: and a rising star in the republican party. he had a big turn at the republican national convention as i recall. >> he
it comes to nontransportation, you'll never guess. who wants to guess? california. who would have thought. >> i would have thought new york. >> exactly. because of subwaist. but this is nontransportation. -- because of subways. but this is nontransportation. 40% of our energy consumption is hvac. heating and cooling buildings, build they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons burry as governor moonbeam but he got it passed. so every building in california had energy standards and it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things -- i said portman and sheheen have been compromising. my view, katrina -- sorry -- sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or another. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry -- we have had 300 or -- sorry. phrasing it wrong. we have had in the last three or four years we have had
. i live in mississippi but i'm retired federal firefighter from california. and disasters, whether it's hurricanes, tornadoes, earthquakes, wildfires, whatever, most jurisdictions find that they're overwhelmed by the time it happens because disasters overwhelm every jurisdiction. so whether you're in new york or down in the coast of mississippi, the jurisdictions that are in charge of trying to mitigate these problems are so overwhelmed, and most are victims themselves. we need a national -- we need a national fire disaster program that exists within the federal government. the resources are there without going to a lot of expense. all disasters is similar to what would happen in a motel. a hotel, if everybody goes into a hotel, they see on the door what to do when a fire starts, how to get out, the hallways are designed to carry the capacity of the people, and so forth. and then once they're out they need to be accounted for. and he'd have an emergency service that can come in and mitigate the problem. most jurisdictions do not have the resources to do this. when it comes to police a
and california and other parts of the country that did not need a fund raiser from the house majority leader. but you saw him putting in face time and getting to know these guys on the trail. possibly in hopes of being able to work with them when they get here. >> or perhaps in securing their vote with republican leader elections, which happen to be right around the corner. one thing that they have got overlooked in the broad scheme of the house, would talk about redistricting as evil. but there are some states that have taken a different approach. the number one state that has taken a different approach is california. california has gone to a bipartisan redistricting commission. they drew lines without input of the state legislature, allegedly without the input of the state legislature. over the last decade, 53 seats in california, five house election cycles. 265 elections in california and only one seat out of those 265 times changed hands. now, though, we have seen -- as they are still counting a lot of districts, but we have seen eight or nine competitive seats with a very interesting st
society organizations which also features the involvement of the university of california san diego. working with the local communities to rethink and refrain the perceptions and understanding of neighborhood security so there are a lot of bottom-up approach is in changing the securities sector. in addition to the high level of policies that we have been discussing such as the initiatives for the police. >> okay. let's take this as our final question and then one more large question to pose to the panel before we break. >> my name is jason, an independent researcher and consultant on issues around policing and the conflict. my question is aimed primarily at bob and i will tweak it for to tunisia. i'm glad he mentioned his paper. it highlighted the problems and the challenges in libya conducting a light footprint and not the kosovo or afghanistan model with hundreds of thousands of people on the ground. and what sort of pushed the democratization and the ssr forward. so i guess the question for bob is what are the considerations to be engaged the conflict, post conflict ssr. what can
. california's 52nd district. california's seventh district. north carolina's seventh district. called on monday was arizona ninth district. so, that is from "the washington times" this morning. the headline, "to west allen, west." he is refusing to concede the house reelection battle. six days later. that is "the washington times" with an update. front royal, virginia, republican, let me go back to you. go ahead. caller: my thought is that i am a republican, but also an american. america voted for obama. we need to pull together as a country. all of the people in the congress and the senate need to pull together and think about what all of the american people need and what is good for this country. if that means that right now republicans have to been in a little bit, they have to do it and fix this budget so that we can move forward as a country. host: taxing the wealthiest americans, is that enough? caller: now, it is not, but we have to make a move forward, working together, and if we do not stop fighting and work together, we will not do anything. host: so, does that mean the demo
in the local proximity. we are now in a global marketplace. i was in california last week. we need to compete across the country. it involves technology, investment in technology. i believe it starts in grades k- 12. talk about jobs between -- for people in their 20s and 30s. if we do not try to be more advanced, we will not be competitive in the global market. >> the middle class here is facing the same problem the middle-class is facing everywhere in the country. our government has not been able to work together because of being controlled by major lobby groups that are not putting in place specific things like comprehensive tax return -- tax reform that makes sense that accumulates revenue and is equitably history. we need to make sure we have comprehensive tax reform that makes sense and address the waste and mismanagement and misallocation of resources we see throughout government as is evidenced in benghazi. we need to address that. we can address that by having more independents there to let the people know there is someone else available to take their place. >> let's move onto the nex
in california. when he was left to california, he was shown around by the conservative components of the party, the governor, who voted for roosevelt and he never saw johnson. he took that very personally on election day. he lost california by 3773 votes. it took two days. he was president for 10 minutes. he calls the his apartment in new york, the butler answer is, and he says, "the president- elect has gone to bed." "welcome and will you tell him when he wakes up that he's no longer president?" literally that is what happened. in those days it took a few days to get all of the returns from the west which turned out to be to his volley. been the greatest issue became preparedness. host: this history show a good track record of when these problems arise to finding ways to counteract them or at least fix them before the next elections take place? guest: policy issues? host: or procedures, what ever. guest: survival has a remarkable effect on political parties. it was unified and vehemently anti-wilson. it came up that year to be warren g. harding of ohio. the rest, as they say, is history. host
congresswoman karen bass from california, "the daily beast" zachary karabell and michael tomasky. he predicted a gop freak o-out romney lost. what will he say tomorrow? "the cycle" is up next. us d with efficient absorption in one daily dose. citracal slow release. >>> it is thursday, november 8th, and you're in "the cycle." what will washington do about taxes and spending cuts? >> i'm krystal ball. let the countdown again, 73 days until the inauguration. come on, nobody can replace hillary. >> amen. i'm toure, i'm not crazy about the cops, but i believe the police. what a great band. i'm excited. we'll have one from
majorities in both chambers ain california and illinois. in the state of carolina, in the state of north carolina they gained a republican super majority in the house and senate. in georgia, they appear unindependent away from having one in the senate. with might winning 24 states on wednesday, no one expected the president's coattails to turn blue. republican gains in the deep, red south is kind of like running up the score. down the ballot has less to do with coat tails than with parka than with hoods. against the bitter cold that defines february or march. outside the virginia state capitol in richmond. voters are looking for leadership at all levels of g governance and they vote in changes. they are not stupid. elections have consequences and they go both ways. tender white meat chicken and vegetables in a crust made from scratch. marie callender's. it's time to savor. in a crust made from scratch. have led to an increase intands clinical depression. drug and alcohol abuse is up. and those dealing with grief don't have access to the professional help they need. when you see these iss
will be seen in retrospect as something close to the proposition in california. incredibly shortsighted with long-term consequences. whatever those republican governors and legislators thought they were doing, every latino population in the country and thought not only are you not competing for are revoked, you do not want our vote to. the gop is not even getting up to have argument about policies of this point. there is this time of tremendous identity of -- how often do you go to church? there is the identity politics. our system is frozen with the two out of three close presidential elections happening. >> right here. >> janet. george washington university school of public health. there was a lot of discussion on women's issues. i am wondering if you can speak to the role of gender in the governing. we are seeing more candidates who are successful in their elections and one state's -- is entirely female. >> kelly ayote. when you have that kind of coalition and the democratic party and that remarkable picture of the congressional committee of all republican and not white men talking a
to guess? [laughter] california. who would have thought? >> i would have thought new york. >> yeah, exactly. >> because of you. >> no. [laughter] of course, because of subways, but this is nontransportation. why? california's per capita -- 40% of our energy consumption is heating and cooling buildings where they be residential, commercial or factory. 35% is transportation. and california in 1978 passed building standards under then-governor brown who was known partially for this in the doons bury as governor moon beam. but he got it passed, so every new building in california had to meet energy efficiency standards. it's made california very efficient. these are the kinds of things, and as i said, portman and shaheen have been working on a compromise on this. these are the kinds of things we can do to make ourselves energy independent. my view, look, katrina -- sorry, sandy gave some impetus to dealing with climate change. and i said in new york we're going to pay for climate change one way or the ore. we can pay for it after each natural disaster. we in new york have had 50 -- sorry, we ha
but actually you can't tell the total number of votes in the nation until california gets around to doing it. you know, some states count them very clean and don't seem to have any problem. >> megyn: how about virginia? is that true of virginia. >> virginia, that has been true. when george allen was defeated for senator six years ago by 6,000 or 7,000 votes, virginia went right down, you know, they went back over that, i believe there was recount or reexpectation of the vote, less than 100 votes changed. it was pretty straightforward. new hampshire is famous for doing that well, too and so forth. other states have had bigger problems. >> bret: we should point out if we put that back up. that was the national popular vote total. that will pop up throughout the night as well. you will see the actual vote total through the night. these are all the states throughout the nation and there you see it as it continues to tick up and for us, after the iowa caucuses, the difference was added, 61256 right now so i don't have to pull out the calculator. >> megyn: didn't you get yelled at by math teacher
of the states that were scared, were not hard hit or some states as far away as california, they have pledged to get the equipment and cruise here into new jersey and new york and connecticut as quickly as possible. one of the things we have been able to do, to give you a sense of how this is an all hands on deck approach, we are able to and c-130's, military transport planes, to move assets and personnel to speed up the process of getting power as soon as possible. our first party is water filtration plants and other critical infrastructure in the state. for that, we have to move some generators, and we have a ship that can help to move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with governor christie's office and local officials to identify what are those critical infrastructures, how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple other things we are concerned about. as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can get to work. there are a lot of folks in jersey who work in new york, in the city, and other places where transportation may be hobble
happy my sister is here from california ander fiancee. -- and her fiancee. [applause] my brother arthur and chad, thank you. [applause] wasgovernor's brother who in an ad with me, i thank him and his family. jeff knight and sharon and todd - i just love all of it. i love all -- all of you. i love you all. courtney the state chairman of the party andi also wanted thank my campaign. team. but the wonderful group of people. -- what a wonderful group of people. john matthews, darren scmidts, my field staff and my campaign chief, lisa booth, ryam bopothfield, mary stitz and everybody else the worked so hard and did so much. [applause] iran, ladies and gentleman -- i ran, ladies and gentleman, because i love this country and that love this state. -- and i love this state. the belief -- i believe so much the fact that we're so fortunate to be americans and to have the opportunity to have the liberty and freedom, the opportunity to do what ever we want to do. that is pretty impressive. the have an opportunity to choose our leaders. we did not always agree. but i congratulate the president tonig
votes right now in california. when they meet this will be on the agenda and should be on the agenda. remember two ways to disinfranchise people. we want that. and another way to be disinfranchised someone who shouldn't be voting cancelled your vote out. >> the book who's counting and how they put your vote at risk. thank you, john. >> gretchen: how many of you think you are better off now than four years ago. stunning worry from the exit polls. on works for president obama. and he's up next . ♪ >> tonight, more than 200 yearrs after a former colony won the right to determine its own destiny, the path of perfecting our union moves forward. begin. tomato, obviously. haha. there's more than that though, there's a kick to it. wahlalalalallala! smooth, but crisp. it's kind of like drinking a food that's a drink, or a drink that's a food, woooooh! [ male announcer ] taste it and describe the indescribable. could've had a v8. [ coughs ] [ baby crying ] ♪ [ male announcer ] robitussin® liquid formula soothes your throat on contact and the active ingredient relieves your cough. robituss
not hard hit, or some as far away as california, they have pledged to start getting equipment, crews, et cetera, into new jersey. we were able to get c-17's, c- 130's, military transport planes potentially to move assets, personnel, to speed up the process of getting power up and running as soon as possible. our first priority is water filtration plants and some other critical infrastructure. for that, we have emergency generators. we have a navy ship that has helicopters that can move assets around the state as well. we are going to be working with local officials to identify those critical infrastructure and how we can get what is needed as quickly as possible. a couple of other things we are concerned about, as power starts coming back on, we want to make sure people can also get to work. a lot folks in jersey work in new york come in the city, and in other places where transportation may be hobbled. one of the things i mentioned is the possibility of us using federal assets, and military assets as well as taking inventory of the country that can be brought in so we can help people ge
the roll. quorum call: a senator: mr. president? the presiding officer: the senator from california. mrs. feinstein: i ask the quorum call be vitiated. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. feinstein: i ask that senator baucus are added as a cosponsor of my amendment, 3018. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. feinstein: i also ask a u.c., dorothy engelhart from my office be granted floor privileges during the remainder of the debate on this pill. the presiding officer: without objection. mrs. feinstein: thank you. i yield the floor. i note the absence of a quorum. the presiding officer: the clerk will call the roll. quorum call: mr. levin: mr. president, i ask unanimous consent that further proceedings under the quorum call be dispensed with. the presiding officer: without objection. mr. levin: i ask it be in order for senator leahy to call up amendment 2955 and the time until 6:00 p.m. be equally divided in the usual form, that at 6:00 p.m. the senate proceed to a vote in relation to the leahy amendment number 2955, further, that there be no amendments in order to the
into the economy in hard-hit states like nevada, florida, ohio, colorado, pennsylvania and california than any institution. they may be more important than the fed. again, we have to look at money in politics. as i say what was then and in effect of a change of opinion. >> this is very interesting. comments from offers speakers that i want to ask at a demographic group none of you touched on this site because distant name i heard of demography being impactful in america. one out of every five americans has a disability and 51% of likely voters said they have a family member with a disability. yet, at the national press club when there was an opportunity or, as you know, the past president of the press club for the romney campaign and the obama can antisense him to some to speak about disability issues, the romney campaign showed not to attend or issue a position paper on disabilities. so i wanted to ask, why given that one out of every five americans has the disability, 51% of american voters has a family or with a disability. why isn't there more of a conversation about that demographic withi
hispanic vote, about 11% this time out and you see an influx of younger people and people from california who have come here and they have changed the complexion of this state. it's now a very purple state. a third democratic, a third republican and this county where i am a third independent. we're here in arapaho which is south of denver, one of the swingiest of the swing counties. you can see behind me they're counting ballots. they're counting ballots that have already been mailed in. that's the numbers we're working on now. this is a big mail in early vote, early state here in arapaho, county. about 68% people mailed in before voting started today. now this is a state that was concerned about voting problems but it didn't turn out that way. because so many people voted early, the polling places were able to handle people who showed up. one area where they had a 90 minute, two hour wait and they said to people look if you change precincts you can go next door and you can vote in five minutes. that said, now this state is really beginning to count the votes that were cast today. about a
what the impact will be on the national figures in the race for president. california, washington, hawaii have gone for obama, idahoor romney. no big surprises there for people. as you see there with the big vote, the national vote here, mitt romney still showing up here at 2 percentage points ahead of barack obama. right now the eyes of the obama and romney campaigns are watching the fates of their campaigns and the future of the nation, all coming in as each return comes in. abc 7 is your election station tonight. senior political reporter is live at the obama campaign. he's in chicago. let's check in with him. >> we have a long and uncertain night but don't tell that to the cheerers here at obama head quarters in chicago. they are very upbeat as they watch the results come in. particularly when they have seen the numbers come in in pennsylvania, from wisconsin, from new hampshire. they believe that gives them a clear path. they also say senior staff that i talked to early tonight that they read the tea leaves yesterday when they saw mitt romney in ohio. they say that was, quote
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